Blog Posts Tagged With Budget Reconciliation

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President Trump To Announce Tax Reform Principles

The Trump Administration is expected to announce its tax reform plan during a 1:30 PM press conference at the White House today. The Administration is boasting that the tax plan will be “the biggest tax cut and the largest tax reform in the history of our country.” We will be covering the press conference, so stay tuned for our summary and analysis of what is proposed. In the meantime, here are our predictions for what we may see:

  • Corporate tax rate reduced to 15%
  • Pass-through business income also taxed at 15%
  • Repeal the corporate AMT
  • Deemed repatriation of accumulated offshore earnings taxed at 10%
  • No destination-based cash flow tax
  • Shift toward territoriality?
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Mnuchin: Tax Reform Timing Likely to Slip and Other Hints at the Administration’s Thinking

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told the Financial Times yesterday to expect tax reform to slip past the August recess, stating that the previously announced timeline was “highly aggressive to not realistic at this point.” Mr. Mnuchin’s interview touched on other areas of tax reform as well, confirming that the Administration has not ruled out the DBCFT (and the ~$1 trillion of revenue it would purportedly raise) while implying that the Administration is also considering alternative revenue raisers.  When asked how the Administration would ensure tax reforms were deficit-neutral, Mr. Mnuchin also stressed the importance of economic growth in generating revenue, implying that the Administration may lean on dynamic scoring to meet the reconciliation process’s budget neutrality requirements. Continue Reading

Fast Facts on the Budget Reconciliation Process

Because the 114th Congress never took up action on a FY 2017 budget, the current Congress has the opportunity to pursue two separate budget resolutions with reconciliation instructions (one for FY 2017 and one for FY 2018). This would give Republicans two opportunities to pass legislation without threat of filibuster in the Senate, which appears to be the plan to push through both legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, as well as tax reform legislation. (Senate debate over budget bills produced in the reconciliation process is limited to 20 hours, so Republicans will not need a 60-vote supermajority to end a filibuster and bring the bill to a vote.)
How does the budget reconciliation process actually work? Continue Reading

Details on the House Health Care Bill’s Numerous Tax Changes

On Monday night the House of Representatives unveiled legislation to repeal and replace the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the “ACA”), which would reduce numerous federal taxes by eliminating almost all of the tax increases that were introduced as part of the ACA.  A copy of the bill is available here.  According to analysis released yesterday by Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation, the bill, titled the American Health Care Act (“AHCA”), is expected to reduce taxes by approximately $600 billion over ten years.  Although the bill leaves untouched the economic substance doctrine that was codified with the ACA, the bill notably provides significant taxpayer relief by:

  • Repealing the 3.8% tax on certain net investment income under Section 1411 for taxable years starting after December 31, 2017
  • Repealing the 0.9% Medicare surtax under Sections 3101 and 1401 on wages above certain thresholds starting after December 31, 2017
  • Reducing to zero the penalty/tax on employers that do not offer qualifying health insurance, effective starting in 2016
  • Reducing to zero the penalty/tax on individuals who do not purchase qualifying health insurance, effective starting in 2016
  • Repealing the annual fees imposed on health insurance providers and certain manufacturers and importers of branded prescription drugs, effective starting in 2018
  • Delaying from 2020 to 2025 the imposition of an excise tax on certain high-value health insurance plans (commonly referred to as “Cadillac plans”)
  • Generally lowering the threshold for deductibility of medical expenses for taxable years starting after December 31, 2017 and extending through 2017 the lower threshold under current law for taxpayers aged 65 or older
  • Repealing the tax on medical devices under Section 4191 for sales after December 31, 2017
  • Repealing the limitation on salary reduction contributions for health flexible spending arrangements under Section 125(i) for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017
  • Increasing the maximum contributions to Health Savings Accounts (“HSAs”) under Section 223 and lowering the applicable tax on distributions from HSAs includible in income for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017
  • Expanding the definition of qualified medical expenses to include non-prescription over-the-counter medicine for purposes of HSAs, Archer MSAs under Section 220, and Health Flexible Spending Arrangements and Health Reimbursement Arrangements under Sections 105 and 106 for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017
  • Repealing the sales tax on indoor tanning services under Section 5000B starting in 2018
  • Eliminating the limitation on deductibility of remuneration for services paid by health insurance providers under Section 162(m) for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017

Unlike prior versions of the bill leaked to the press in recent weeks, the AHCA does not include a cap on the exclusion from income for employer-provided health insurance under current law. Continue Reading

Setting the Stage for Comprehensive Tax Reform

Tax reform will be one of the top priorities for the 115th Congress. Hopes for pursuing tax reform to a successful conclusion are high, given one-party control of the government (and exuberant campaign promises). Following the 2016 election, Davis Polk laid out the background and context in which tax reform measures will be considered, with links to summaries of the leading proposals and details on the politics of tax reform. Although life in Washington has moved forward since this memo was published, the key points and players remain the same. Read on for things to watch.

Setting the Stage for Comprehensive Tax Reform, December 2, 2016

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