Blog Posts Tagged With Repatriation

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Treasury Issues Guidance on Deemed Repatriation

Just days after the bill popularly known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “TCJA”) was signed into law on December 22, the Treasury Department issued Notice 2018-07, summarizing the regulations Treasury intends to issue on the manner in which taxpayers will determine amounts included in gross income by a United States shareholder under the deemed repatriation provisions of the TCJA.   You can read the Notice here.
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Comparison of the Final House and Senate Bills

While the last-minute changes made to the Senate Bill brought the House and Senate Bills closer together, a number of important differences remain.  The House and Senate will attempt to hammer out these differences over the next few weeks in conference committee. In the meantime, we have prepared a comparison of the more salient provisions of the two bills.

You can view the full text of the bills on our House Bill Navigator and Senate Bill Navigator. We also ran a comparison of the final Senate Bill against the initial legislative text, which is available here.
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House Ways and Means Committee Report on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

The House Ways and Means Committee’s official Report on H.R. 1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the tax reform bill that passed the House, includes additional explanations of the bill that were not previously included in the Committee’s initial section-by-section summary (or additional summary) or the Joint Committee on Taxation’s description of the bill.  The Committee Report also addresses certain technical issues with the bill.

Deemed repatriation inclusion mechanics.  For example, the Committee Report acknowledges that the bill’s mandatory deemed repatriation provisions requiring U.S. shareholders to include their pro rata share of their specified foreign corporation’s earnings and profits could be interpreted to require multiple inclusions with respect to the same earnings and profits in certain cases. 
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Chairman Hatch’s Modifications at a Glance

Last night the Joint Committee on Taxation released a description of Senate Finance Committee Chairman Hatch’s proposed Modifications to the Senate Mark of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.  Reports in anticipation of the Chairman’s Modifications had described them as intended to reduce the deficit increases otherwise expected under the initial Senate Mark.  The JCT also released an updated score last night that reflects the impact of the Chairman’s Modification. In addition to modifying the tax brackets applicable to individuals, increasing the child tax credit, and repealing the individual mandate to obtain health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, the Modification make several noteworthy revisions to the original Chairman’s Mark.
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More on the Senate Mark’s Deemed Repatriation

Like its House bill, the Senate Mark released Thursday provides for a one-time transition tax on untaxed accumulated earnings and profits (“E&P”) of certain non-U.S. corporations. The proposal splits E&P between cash and non-cash amounts with cash taxed at a 10% effective rate and non-cash taxed at a 5% effective rate. The highlights:

Basic Framework.  Under the proposal, 10% U.S. shareholders of a non-U.S. corporation generally will include in income their pro rata share of the foreign corporation’s previously untaxed accumulated E&P, determined as of November 9, 2017 or some undefined other appropriate measurement date (whichever produces more E&P). Non-U.S.
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Senate Mark at a Glance

The Senate Finance Committee Chairman’s Mark (Senate Mark) released last night diverges sharply in many respects from the House Bill.  Although in summary form, the Senate Mark describes a comprehensive tax reform proposal that will take some time to analyze. In the meantime, the table below summarizes key features of the Senate Mark, together with a comparison to the final House Bill.

We have also released an initial version of our Senate Bill Navigator, a hyperlinked version of the Senate Mark built to ease your navigation of its text, which you can find here.

Corporates.  As expected, the Senate Mark calls for a permanent reduction in the corporate tax rate to 20%, with implementation delayed until 2019.
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Brady’s Second Amendment at a Glance

Chairman Brady released another manager’s amendment to the House Bill this afternoon. This amendment was promptly approved by the House Ways and Means Committee 24-16 and included in the House Bill reported to the floor.

We have incorporated this amendment into the text of the Chairman’s Mark and have generated a PDF comparison showing the revised sections, which you can find here. Click here for a comparison that shows the entirety of the bill’s text. Both comparisons are against the bill as amended on November 6th. We will follow up in the morning with an updated Tax Bill Navigator, reflecting the final bill as reported to the House floor.
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The House Tax Bill Provisions Affecting Private Equity

The House tax bill contains several provisions that could significantly affect private equity sponsors, investors and portfolio companies. Below we have highlighted a number of these proposals, including discussions of:

Carried Interest. The House bill generally would limit the favorable taxation of carried interest to investments that have a holding period of more than three years, and treat carried interest attributable to gains on investments held for three years or less as short-term capital gain (taxed at the rates applicable to ordinary income).
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Weekly Roundup: Key Posts and What’s on Deck This Week

Last week was a busy week at Tax Reform And Transition. House Republicans released text of a tax reform bill on Thursday (view the full bill through our Tax Bill Navigator), followed by an official Chairman’s Mark on Friday. Late Friday night, the Joint Committee on Taxation released an official summary of the Chairman’s Mark, together with their assessment of the revenue effects and distributional effects of the Chairman’s Mark.

You can read our grid summarizing the key provisions of the bill here. Here’s a round up of the tax reform topics covered in our more detailed posts so far:


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More on the House Tax Bill’s Deemed Repatriation

As widely expected, the tax reform bill released today by House Republicans provides for a one-time transition tax on untaxed accumulated earnings and profits (“E&P”) of certain non-U.S. corporations. Under the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,” E&P would be split between cash or cash equivalents and non-cash amounts, with cash and cash equivalents taxed at 12% and non-cash amounts taxed at 5%. The highlights:

Basic Framework.  Under the bill, 10% U.S. shareholders of a non-U.S. corporation generally will include in income their pro rata share of the foreign corporation’s previously untaxed accumulated E&P, determined as of November 2, 2017 or December 31, 2017 (whichever produces more E&P).
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The House Tax Bill at a Glance

The draft legislative text released today comes in at over 400 pages, and will take some time to analyze.  In the meantime, the table below summarizes key features of the bill.  In addition, a section-by-section summary prepared by the House Ways and Means Committee is available here.  We have also released an updated version of our Tax Bill Navigator, a hyperlinked version of the bill built to ease your navigation of its text, which you can find here.

As expected, the bill calls for an immediate and permanent reduction in the corporate tax rate to 20%.  The bill significantly limits the deductibility of interest expense for certain businesses, introducing a cap equal to 30% of earnings before taxes, depreciation and amortization, and limits other deductions but provides for immediate expensing of depreciable assets on a temporary basis.  
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Senate Finance Explores International Tax Reform

In the first hearing on tax reform since the “Big Six” released their framework last week, the Senate Finance Committee focused on international tax reform. The academics invited to testify criticized the framework proposal, which combines elements of a territorial system and a minimum tax, and took the opportunity to advocate their own proposals for international tax reform. While Chairman Hatch (R-UT) expressed support for a move to a territorial regime, Ranking Member Wyden (D-OR) characterized the framework as a “corporate wish list.”

Professor Itai Grinberg voiced a full-throated defense of a territorial system, arguing that the current U.S.
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The Big Six Framework “Arrives”

The Big Six tax reform framework has arrived, sort of. The Big Six officially released “The Unified Framework for Fixing our Broken Tax Code” this morning, in a format (and in many ways content) that resembles the House Republican blueprint from 2016. Although more detailed than the proposal put forward by the Trump administration in April, the Framework leaves a number of key decisions up to the House and Senate tax writing committees. Without further ado, here is a summary of what the Framework contains:

A few initial observations:

Not a Lot of Detail.  While the framework sets forth a rough outline of a tax reform bill, the level of detail contained in the framework and the number of instances where the framework specifically leaves discretion to the tax writing committees indicates that the plan is very fluid at this stage.
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(Re)Setting the Stage for Comprehensive Tax Reform: Big Six Send First Signals

The Legislative Calendar: Six Months In.  With yesterday’s late night last ditch failed effort by the Senate to pass a so-called “skinny” repeal of the Affordable Care Act, the Republican controlled chamber has nearly run the clock on its strategy for passing major legislation by majority vote, which relied on reconciliation instructions under the FY 2017 budget resolution (a process we highlighted back in December). Congress will soon need to adopt budget resolutions for the 2018 fiscal year if regular order is to be readopted and any progress is to be made on the President’s budget proposals (which are traditionally only a starting point for negotiations).
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Prospects for Tax Reform in 2017?

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) addressed the National Association of Manufacturers on Tuesday in an effort to build support for tax reform, emphasizing the unique, and diminishing, window of opportunity that exists to enact permanent tax reform ahead of next year’s primaries and midterm elections. According to his press office, this speech marks the beginning of his “sales pitch” for tax reform in 2017. Speaker Ryan’s prepared remarks are available here. You can also watch his speech here (starting at 1:41:34).

Here are the key takeaways:

  • Republicans Are Aiming for End of 2017:  Speaker Ryan said that lawmakers would “begin to turn” their plan into legislation to put in front of Congress, and promised to “get this done in 2017.” We have heard this line before, both from Speaker Ryan and from Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin during the press conference unveiling Trump’s tax principles.

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Back to Basics: Camp Plan Revisited

As the Trump administration and House and Senate leaders huddle to find a path to permanent tax reform, the detailed draft legislation released in 2014 by former Rep. Dave Camp will be among the ideas considered.

Relative to the Blueprint, the Camp proposal takes a traditional approach to tax reform, with a focus on broadening the tax base to achieve lower tax rates.  We will consider various elements of the Camp plan and begin today with a recap of certain of its international components.

Territoriality.  In a significant move toward a territorial system, U.S. corporations that receive dividends from 10%-owned non-U.S.
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Reactions to the Trump Tax Plan

As noted in yesterday’s summary, the basic outline of the Trump Administration’s tax plan is largely similar to the Trump campaign proposals, with fewer details and with one notable shift toward the House Blueprint’s approach – the move toward territoriality. The table below shows how this latest plan compares to the House Blueprint and the Trump 2016 campaign plan.

In the press conference to announce the “broad-strokes” plan, both Treasury Secretary Mnuchin and National Economic Council Director Cohn said that they were in agreement with members of Congress over the four driving goals of tax reform – grow the economy and create millions of jobs, simplify the tax code, provide tax relief to American families, especially middle-income families and lower the business tax rate from one of the highest in the world to one of the lowest.
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President Trump To Announce Tax Reform Principles

The Trump Administration is expected to announce its tax reform plan during a 1:30 PM press conference at the White House today. The Administration is boasting that the tax plan will be “the biggest tax cut and the largest tax reform in the history of our country.” We will be covering the press conference, so stay tuned for our summary and analysis of what is proposed. In the meantime, here are our predictions for what we may see:

  • Corporate tax rate reduced to 15%
  • Pass-through business income also taxed at 15%
  • Repeal the corporate AMT
  • Deemed repatriation of accumulated offshore earnings taxed at 10%
  • No destination-based cash flow tax
  • Shift toward territoriality?

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Tax Reform and Revenue Raisers

One of the biggest challenges facing lawmakers in the current tax reform process is finding a way to reduce headline tax rates in a revenue neutral way. Some revenue raisers (like eliminating itemized deductions) would raise significant revenue and simplify the tax code. Other revenue raisers come at the cost of increased complexity, at least in the short term (e.g., implementing a federal VAT or a new carbon tax). Closer inspection of ideas on the table reveals that politically popular reforms are not necessarily the largest revenue raisers. For example, there seems to be bipartisan support for taxing carried interest as ordinary income (more on that here), a relatively small revenue raiser.
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Sanders/Schatz Tax Reform Bill: A Recent Data Point from the Democrats

While House Republicans could use the budget reconciliation process to pass tax reform without the need for Democratic support, leaders in the Senate have indicated a desire for bipartisan reform. White House press secretary Sean Spicer’s statement earlier this week on the tax reform process also suggests that input from the Democrats may be relevant.

With that in mind, we thought it would be useful to highlight a bill introduced in the Senate by Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Brian Schatz (D-HI) – the “Corporate Tax Dodging Prevention Act of 2017.” A companion bill was introduced in the House of Representatives by Representative Jan Schakowsky (D-IL).
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